Tau Protein And Concussions

Tau Protein And Concussions – Tau is one of the microtubules associated proteins that are thought to have a role in the stabilization of neuronal microtubule. They  are  mainly  expressed  in  neurons  where  they  play  an important role in the assembly of tubulin monomers into microtubules to constitute the neuronal microtubules network. Microtubules are involved in maintaining the cell  shape and serve as tracks for axonal transport. Tau proteins also establish some links between microtubules and other cytoskeletal elements or proteins.

 

Tau Protein And Concussions

Tau Protein And Concussions

 

Tau Protein And Concussions – A concussion is a disturbance in brain function that occurs following either a blow to the head or as a result of the violent shaking of the head. These effects can be short-term, lasting only a few hours or a couple of days, or cause long-term problems. The sudden movement causes the brain to bounce and twist around inside the skull, stretching and damaging the delicate cells and structures inside your brain. This damage can cause physical and chemical changes in your brain to affect how it functions.

Tau Protein And Concussions – A Research

A team led by Jessica Gill, R.N., Ph.D. of the National Institute of Nursing Research at the National Institutes of Health and Jeffrey Bazarian, M.D., M.P.H. of the University of Rochester Medical Center evaluated changes in tau in 46 Division I and III college athletes who experienced a concussion. Tau, which plays a role in the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE, frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer’s disease was measured in preseason blood samples and again within 6 hours following concussion using an ultra-sensitive technology that allows researchers to detect single protein molecules.

The athletes – a mix of soccer, football, basketball, hockey and lacrosse players from the University of Rochester and Rochester Institute of Technology – were divided into two groups based on recovery time. Athletes in the “long return to play” group took more than 10 days to recover following concussion, while athletes in the “short return to play” group took less than 10 days to return to their sport.

 

 

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