Which Eubacteria Help Plants In The Production Of Proteins

Which Eubacteria Help Plants In The Production Of Proteins – Eubacteria, are prokaryotic (lacking nucleus) cells that are very common in human daily life, encounter many more times than the archaebacteria. Eubacteria can be found almost everywhere and kill thousands upon thousands of people each year, but also serve as antibiotics producers and food digesters in our stomachs.

Which Eubacteria Help Plants In The Production Of Proteins
Which Eubacteria Help Plants In The Production Of Proteins

Which Eubacteria Help Plants In The Production Of Proteins – Plants make proteins in much the same way as all eukaryotic organisms. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins, and ribosomes add amino acid after amino acid to an elongating peptide chain. The order of the amino acids in the chain is determined by the messenger RNA protein, which, in turn, is an RNA copy of a particular gene in DNA.

Protein is made from nitrate, a form of nitrogen that has been fixed by microorganisms. Plants cannot use nitrogen directly, so they rely on bacteria to convert the nitrogen into a form they can use. These bacteria reside near the roots of the plants or in special structures on the roots called nodules. The bacteria in nodules have formed a symbiotic relationship with the plants where they exchange usable nitrogen for sugar from the plant.

Which Eubacteria Help Plants In The Production Of Proteins – Nitrogen-fixing bacteria, microorganisms capable of transforming atmospheric nitrogen into fixed nitrogen (inorganic compounds usable by plants). More than 90 percent of all nitrogen fixation is effected by these organisms, which thus play an important role in the nitrogen cycle.

The symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria invade the root hairs of host plants, where they multiply and stimulate formation of root nodules, enlargements of plant cells and bacteria in intimate association. Within the nodules the bacteria convert free nitrogen to ammonia, which the host plant utilizes for its development. To ensure sufficient nodule formation and optimum growth of legumes (e.g., alfalfa, beans, clovers, peas, soybeans), seeds are usually inoculated with commercial cultures of appropriate Rhizobium species, especially in soils poor or lacking in the required bacterium.

 

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